Maniac Cop (1988)

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There’s far too much plot development and far too little action in Maniac Cop. 

It is Maniac Cop’s amusing title that attracted me to the film, its tagline ‘You have the right to remain silent… forever’ also made me laugh, however William Lustig’s Maniac Cop is a classic example of all concept and no substance. A sixty-second trailer may draw you in, but the feature length production is pitifully executed.

The film opens with three murder sequences, all of which are amateurish and underwhelming. I wasn’t concerned, the film had only just begun, I was confident that it would soon shift a gear into gore hound territory; after all, the Blu-ray copy I watched was an Arrow Films release. This gear change unfortunately never happens, the filmmakers instead develop a dull, nonsensical thriller-mystery narrative rather than prove their ingenuity with corn syrup and gore. A Cormanesque producer should have economically stripped the script of generic narrative filler, emphasised its core high concept and employed Tom Savini, the highly talented and twisted SFX man responsible for the gore in films such as Dawn of the Dead (1978), Day of the Dead (1985), Friday the 13th (1980) and William Lustig’s earlier film Maniac (1980).

I can’t really be bothered to name characters or summarise plot, but I’ll try. The film opens with a young woman being chased by two hoodlums, she escapes the pair and approaches an ominous looking police officer, who, rather than serving and protecting her, strangles her to death. The film then follows Detective Frank McCrae (Tom Atkins), who believes the hoodlums’ claims that a police officer committed the crime, his evidence-bereft belief turning very quickly into adamancy based solely on his venerable cop’s instinct – this is of course all completely stupid. Bruce Campbell then turns up as Jack Forrest, a cop who is framed for the murders of the tabloid press dubbed ‘Maniac Cop’. The best performance of the film is delivered by Robert Z’Dar’s enormous jaw, it lends a palpable strength and menace to his character Matt Cordell. I am now too bored to continue writing this.

Believe it or not, William Lustig and Larry Cohen should have taken a leaf out of Troma’s book. I recently watched The Toxic Avenger, a film that, like the rest of Troma’s catalogue, tried its utmost to be completely camp and awful. Unlike the majority of Troma’s catalogue however, there are enough laughs and torrents of gore in The Toxic Avenger to make it something of a success. Maniac Cop on the other hand has no sense of humour, no excessive violence and no lashings of crass sexuality; it’s an utterly stillborn slasher film that leads its viewers through a grindingly banal narrative to a denouement that’s seriously amateurish. When the credits roll, you’ll be left wondering ‘…is that it?’

38%

12 Angry Men (1957)

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’12 Angry Men’ is a true timeless classic.

The film examines prejudice and the sheer callousness of human behaviour, issues which will forever be relevant. After being retired by a seemingly indifferent judge, a vote declares that 11 out of the 12 jurors are happy to see the accused, an 18-year-old Latino from the slums, be executed by the state. Initially this seems unremarkable, you assume that they all have good reasons for their verdict. However it’s soon apparent that most of the jurors have just glossed over the facts, reaching their damning conclusion because they ‘just think he’s guilty’ – there’s even one juror who can’t wait to leave the room so he can go to a baseball game.

Only Juror #8 (Henry Fonda) is disturbed by the hastiness of it all; he doesn’t know whether the kid is guilty, he just wants to at least talk about it before the jury so swiftly condemns him to death.

I’ve praised films such as ‘Killer Joe’ for their success in engrossing its audience despite much of its story occurring in very few locations. However, compared to ’12 Angry Men’, ‘Killer Joe’ is a veritable action adventure – this legal drama never leaves the jury room. Its success in gripping its audience and fully involving them in the characters and plot is a masterful achievement of writer Reginald Rose.

At the table sits a spectrum of personalities, all of whom you can identify and resonate with. Some are measured, some are fickle, some are blinkered and one or two are downright pig-headed and obnoxious. The natural, timeless performances allow you to cross-examine them; they are all personalities one has come across before, and the viewer can probably draw parallels to people they know – this is one of the film’s core strengths.

Sidney Lumet’s debut feature is to be lauded for its reserve and lack of sensationalism. There may be those who doubt the credibility of the some of the case developments, but to my relief, I personally found few if no traces of hyperbole or implausibility.

’12 Angry Men’ is a film that I truly admire, a timeless classic that deserves the attention of all generations – it will continue to live on as many of its contemporaries continue to date.

90%